Davido, Other Celebrities Pledge Support For Cynthia Morgan’s Comeback

Nigerian celebrities including hip hop star, Davido on Sunday pledged support for the embattled queen of dancehall, Cynthia Morgan.

Cynthia Morgan had earlier in an Instagram live video with Sandra Ogbebor bared it all on how she has been struggling with her music career.

She revealed how her relationship with her former music label Northside Entertainment ended on a sour note with her losing her royalties and eventually running into depression and financial troubles.

Celebrities and fans in reaction to this pledged support for Cynthia Morgan and opened a GoFundMe fund raising account for her.

Davido however tweeted that he is willing to feature her in a new song.
“Tell Cynthia I got an anthem for her ….. I’ll record my verse verse now,” Davido tweeted.

READ ALSO: Fans Push For Cynthia Morgan’s Comeback, Open GoFundMe Account

This got Cynthia Morgan teary as she replied to Davido with crying emojis.

Also, popular OAP Dotun in his tweet said Morgan was a promising artist and she deserves a come back.

On the real I don’t understand why we all don’t see how wrong these things can turn out. Cynthia Morgan was a promising artiste. This girl was literally on fire. You took her name, took her growth. Why can’t you renegotiate? This has moved from just business to sheer wickedness

— Do2dtun Energy gAD (@iamDo2dtun) May 24, 2020

Big brother Naija star, Tacha in her reaction to the trends went down memory lane. She narrated how the German Juice crooner influenced her life with hit track ‘Dont Break My Heart,’ while she was in the University.

Firstly let me start off by saying that I’m currently in a state of SULLEN💔
Few years ago CYNTHIA MORGAN was UNSTOPPABLE her ART was UNIQUE🔥
Personally I first fell in love with “Don’t Break My Heart” back then in school, my 200lvl to be more precise.

— TACHA🔱🇳🇬🇬🇭 (@Symply_Tacha) May 24, 2020

Toke Makinwa in her reaction sued for peace between Cynthia Morgan and her former manager. “We just want music,” she tweeted.

It’s easier said than done, I may not have all the answers, it is a sad situation for both parties, hoping they both can work something out. I’m such a huge fan of Cynthia Morgan and I can’t deny the genius that Jude is too. We just want music 🎵

— Toke Makinwa (@tokstarr) May 24, 2020

Confusion, Jitters As Indian Domestic Flights Resume-katamablog

Domestic flights resumed in India on Monday even as coronavirus cases surge, while confusion about quarantine rules prompted jitters among passengers and the cancellation of dozens of planes.

India had halted all flights within the country, and departing and leaving for abroad, in late March as it sought to stop the spread of coronavirus with the world’s largest lockdown.

But desperate to get Asia’s third-largest economy moving again, the government announced last week that around 1,050 daily flights — a third of the usual capacity — would resume on Monday.

Aviation Minister Hardeep Singh Puri said strict rules would include mandatory mask-wearing and thermal screenings, although middle seats on the aircraft would not be kept empty.

The announcement reportedly caught airlines and state authorities off-guard, with several local governments announcing that passengers would have to go into quarantine for two weeks on arrival.

Maharashtra, the Indian state with the highest number of coronavirus cases, capped at 50 the number of departures and arrivals in and out of its capital Mumbai.

Airlines scrapped dozens of flights on Monday while hundreds of passengers cancelled their bookings, reports said.

The NDTV news channel said 82 flights to and from New Delhi had been cancelled and nine at Bangalore airport.

Other flights from cities including infection hotspots Mumbai and Chennai were struck off, many at short notice, reports said.

At Mumbai airport social distancing was forgotten as irate passengers harangued staff after their flights were cancelled at the last minute.

– ‘Really scary’ –

At New Delhi airport, hundreds of people anxious to get home but apprehensive about the risks queued from before dawn — all wearing masks and standing at least one metre (three feet) apart.

Security personnel behind plastic screens verified check-in documents and that passengers had the government contact tracing app, Aarogya Setu, on their phones.

“While I’m looking forward (to flying home), the idea of flying is really scary,” student Gladia Laipubam told AFP as she stood in line.

“Anything can happen. It’s very risky. I don’t really know when I’ll be able to come back to Delhi now. There is no clarity from the university too at this time.”

One female airline employee wearing gloves, a mask and a protective face shield said she and many other colleagues felt “very nervous” about starting work again.

“Dealing with so many people at this time is so risky. I must have interacted with at least 200 people since this morning,” she told AFP, not wishing to be named.

Cabin crew on the planes had to wear full protective suits with masks, plastic visors and blue rubber gloves, and many were also confused about the rules, the Press Trust of India reported.

“There is no clarity on whether I need to go into home quarantine for 14 days after returning to my base or show up for duty on Monday,” one pilot told PTI.

New coronavirus cases in India crossed 6,000 for the third consecutive day on Sunday, surging to a record single-day spike of 6,767 infections.

The country has recorded almost 140,000 cases and over 4,000 deaths.

Singh has said that international flights could resume in June, although dozens of special flights have in recent weeks brought back some of the hundreds of thousands of Indians stuck abroad.

Two Killed, 1,613 Households Razed As Fire Engulfs IDP Camp In Borno-katamablog

Several Reported Dead As Fire Guts Borno IDP Camp

About 1,613 houses at the Muna garage Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp in Maiduguri, have been gutted by fire.

Two persons who sustained severe burns died from their wounds.

Chairperson of the Borno State Emergency Management Agency, Yabawa Kolo said the incidence happened on the eve of the Eid-El-Fitr.

Governor Babagana Zulum has visited the camp to ascertain the level of destruction caused by the fire.

READ ALSO: NSCDC Arrest Man In Ondo For Allegedly Defiling His Two Daughters

Zulum said the incessant fire incidences in makeshift camps further underscores why camps should be completely closed down in the state.

The governor revealed that the federal government has approved the construction of ten thousand housing units across the state, withnthe affected population in mind.

He said the construction will commence immediately funds are released to bring an end to the idea of living in temporary shelters.

In the first quarter of this year alone, several IDP camps in Nganzai, Ngala, Mafa and Monguno local governments were gutted by fire as a result of the cluster settlement of the people.

Pandemic Gives Dubai Chance To Put Tech To Test-Katamablog

From smart police helmets to research labs, the novel coronavirus has given Dubai an opportunity to test its technological and scientific clout as it shapes its approach to the pandemic.

A key part of the glitzy Gulf emirate’s fight is its COVID-19 Command and Control Centre, set up to coordinate the efforts of Dubai’s doctors, epidemiologists and other professionals.

It is hosted within the Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU) in Dubai’s Healthcare City, also home to state-of-the-art hospitals, labs and research centres.

“For several years, Dubai has endeavoured to put in place solid digital infrastructure, and this has contributed to the fight against the coronavirus”, said Amer Sharif, who heads the multidisciplinary centre.

It was established at the start of the health crisis by Dubai Crown Prince and social media star Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum.

In one room, young mask-wearing men and women sit at carefully separated desks crunching data on laptops and coordinating with workers on the ground.

The initiative includes a scientific team whose role is “to stay abreast of the latest advances in research and scientific evidence, both in the country and elsewhere in the world”, team head Alawi Alsheikh-Ali told AFP.

– ‘Data and science’ –

The United Arab Emirates has carried out more than 1.6 million coronavirus tests, and has officially declared over 28,700 infections, including 244 deaths.

This high-tech approach, Sharif said, including “the complete digitisation of the health system”, has prevented a greater spread of the virus and made the lockdown easier.

Tom Loney, associate professor of public health and epidemiology at MBRU, said the coronavirus was an opportunity for Dubai to put its capabilities to the test.

“It’s the ability to react, to make quick decisions based on data and science” that sets Dubai apart, said Loney, who is also an adviser to authorities in the city-state.

According to him decisions were made by order of Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, whose portrait is featured on the MBRU building.

Dubai is one of seven emirates in the UAE, a key Gulf state with big technological and scientific ambitions.

The emirate lacks the oil wealth of its neighbours, but has the most diversified economy in the Gulf, building a reputation as a financial, commercial and tourism hub.

The UAE sent an astronaut into space last year, and in July is set to launch the first Arab probe towards Mars, a project sponsored by the emir of Dubai.

– ‘Own model’ –

Many tech options were already at Dubai’s fingertips when the pandemic struck, and the emirate was quick at putting its technology to a variety of uses during the virus crisis.

Police wear smart helmets that take the temperature of passers-by while laboratories make protective masks using 3D printers.

When a night-time curfew begins, Dubai residents — 90 percent of whom are expats — receive a reminder message on their mobile phone in Arabic, English or other languages.

The UAE has regularly announced research advances into the COVID-19 illness, developing several apps to help manage the pandemic.

One of them, Alhosn, which the government has encouraged residents to download, helps track people who are infected with the virus or who may have come in close contact with confirmed cases.

But the use of technology to fight the pandemic has raised concern across the world over government surveillance and privacy risks.

Tech experts and the media have highlighted this issue in the UAE, where some foreign websites and applications are already blocked.

But Sharif pushed back against scepticism.

“Dubai and the Emirates respect privacy, whether it is a question of patient records or smart applications”, he said.

The emirate was creating its “own model” of responding to the health crisis, Sharif added, though authorities were also looking at countries such as South Korea, seen as a positive policy response to the crisis.

“We must follow the developments… but also add to them,” he said.

Police Fire Tear Gas At Hong Kong Protesters-katamablog

Police fired tear gas and water cannon at thousands of Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters who gathered Sunday against a controversial security law proposed by China, in the most intense clashes in months.

As the demonstrators and police were facing off in the semi-autonomous financial hub, Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi insisted in Beijing that the proposed law must be imposed “without the slightest delay”.

The planned legislation is expected to ban treason, subversion and sedition, and comes after Hong Kong was shaken last year by months of massive, often-violent protests, and repeated warnings from Beijing that it would not tolerate dissent.

With campaigners warning the proposal could spell the end of the city’s treasured freedoms, thousands gathered in the busy Causeway Bay and Wan Chai districts, chanting slogans, as some masked protesters set up makeshift barricades to stop police vehicles.

“People may be criminalised only for words they say or publish opposing the government,” 25-year-old protester Vincent told AFP.

“I think Hong Kongers are very frustrated because we didn’t expect this to come so fast and so rough. But… we won’t be as naive as to believe that Beijing will simply sit back and do nothing. Things will only get worse here.”

READ ALSONigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Riot police were deployed after earlier warnings from authorities against unauthorised assembly and the city’s current coronavirus-linked law banning public gatherings of more than eight people.

As the number of protesters swelled, police fired tear gas and pepper spray to try and disperse the crowd, and later deployed water cannon and armoured vehicles.

The protest followed a similar pattern to many of last year’s rallies, with police firing tear gas and pepper spray, and demonstrators pushing back. Some threw objects such as umbrellas at the police.

Police said they had arrested 40 people.

The scenes on Sunday were the most intense in months. The Hong Kong pro-democracy movement had previously fizzled at the beginning of 2020 as arrests mounted and, later, large gatherings were banned to stop the coronavirus.

More than 8,300 people have been arrested since the protests erupted last year. Around 200 were detained during small rallies at malls on Mother’s Day earlier this month.

Hong Kong residents enjoy rights — including freedom of speech — unseen on the Chinese mainland, as well as its own legal system and trade status.

Fears had been growing for years that Beijing was chipping away at those freedoms and tightening its control on the city, and campaigners have described the new proposal as the most brazen move yet.

– ‘I’m very scared’ –

Of particular concern is a provision allowing Chinese security agents to operate in Hong Kong, and that they could launch a crackdown against those dissenting the mainland’s Communist rulers.

“I’m very scared, but I still have to come out,” said protester Christy Chan, 23.

“Aside from being peaceful, rational, and non-violent, I don’t see many ways to send out our messages.”

Despite the alarm in Hong Kong and in some Western capitals, Chinese and city officials have insisted the proposed law is needed to prevent unrest and protect national security.

A top pro-Beijing official claimed Saturday that mainland Chinese law enforcement would not operate in the city without “approval” from local authorities.

But there is deep mistrust of China’s opaque legal system in Hong Kong and of how Beijing might use the proposed regulations in the city.

The massive protests last year were sparked by a now-scrapped bill that would have allowed extraditions to the mainland, and there are fears the new motion would be even more wide-ranging.

China’s legislature is expected to rubber-stamp the draft resolution on Thursday before the details are fleshed out at another meeting at a later date.

Officials have said the law would then be implemented locally.

Anti-Viral Drug Remdesivir Works Against COVID-19 – New Study

This file photo taken on April 8, 2020 shows one vial of the drug Remdesivir during a press conference about the start of a study with the Ebola drug Remdesivir in particularly severely ill patients at the University Hospital Eppendorf (UKE) in Hamburg, northern Germany, amidst the new coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic. Ulrich Perrey / POOL / AFP

Anti-viral drug remdesivir cuts recovery times in coronavirus patients, according to the full results of a trial published Friday night, three weeks after America’s top infectious diseases expert said the study showed the medication has “clear-cut” benefits.

Complete results from the research, which was carried out by US government agency the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), were published by leading medical periodical the New England Journal of Medicine.

The United States authorized the emergency use of remdesivir in hospitals on May 1, followed by Japan, while Europe is considering following suit.

The study found that remdesivir, injected intravenously daily for 10 days, accelerated the recovery of hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to a placebo in clinical tests on just over a thousand patients across 10 countries.

On April 29, NIAID director Anthony Fauci, who has become the US government’s trusted face on the coronavirus pandemic, said preliminary evidence indicated remdesivir had a “clear-cut, significant and positive effect in diminishing the time to recovery.”

The National Institutes of Health, of which the NIAID is a part, said Friday in a statement online that investigators found “remdesivir was most beneficial for hospitalized patients with severe disease who required supplemental oxygen.”

But the authors of the trial wrote that the drug did not prevent all deaths.

“Given high mortality despite the use of remdesivir, it is clear that treatment with an anti-viral drug alone is not likely to be sufficient,” they said.

About 7.1 percent of patients given remdesivir in the trial group died within 14 days — compared with 11.9 percent in the placebo group.

However, the result is just below the statistical reliability threshold, meaning it could be down to chance rather than the capability of the drug.

Davido, Tiwa Savage, Mr Eazi Talk Stereotypes, Afrobeats In Latest Issue Of Billboard Magazine-Katamablog

A photo combination of pop stars Tiwa Savage, Davido, and Mr Eazi.

Nigerian music heavyweights, Davido, Tiwa Savage, and Mr. Eazi covered the May edition of the American magazine Billboard, where they discussed afrobeat and stereotypes in the music industry.

An ecstatic Davido (real name David Adeleke) tweeted, “The forces that unite us are intrinsic and greater than the superimposed influences that keep us apart.” – Africa Must Unite!.”

He then proceeded to share the photos of him alone on the cover of the magazine, another with Tiwa Savage shot by Lakin Ogunbanwo, and a solo shot of Mr Eazi shot by Seye Isikalu.

In their interview with the magazine, the trio covered a lot of grounds, starting with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their music, the afrobeat renaissance, and the stereotyping of African acts by the west.

Davido in his response said, “Man, it’s been crazy because my fiancée actually tested positive [for COVID-19 but has since recovered]. I was on tour in America, with six shows done and 19 sold-out shows left. We were in Denver sitting in my hotel room listening to the news. We looked at each other and said, ‘Yo, let’s just tell ourselves the truth: It’s about to be a wrap.’”

For Tiwa Savage, it was difficult wrapping her head around the situation in the beginning.

“I’ve been giving out food to people around my neighborhood. I can quarantine for a month or a couple of months, but some of these people don’t even have food for tomorrow.”

On his own part, Mr. Eazi said he has been using the lockdown to tighten some business knots.

“Musically, it’s been an eye-opener for me. During this lockdown, I’ve not recorded any new music. But I’m on Zoom calls almost the whole day working on my business or [talking] with one of my new artists, listening to records and setting up release plans.”

While Tiwa Savage attributed the phenomenal rise in afrobeats to social media, Davido said it is simply the unique flow of the music. Mr Eazi thought different: “Hey, I’m African, it’s great to be African, and we’re flaunting it.”

When asked about the stereotypes the west still had about Africa, Davido recalled an incident in Los Angeles where an interviewer asked him whether afrobeats is a phase. He called the question “ignorant,” and pointed out that “like everywhere else, there are good parts and bad parts in Africa. There are places even in America that look worse.”

Tiwa Savage’s anger is about the west’s belief that “Africans don’t speak English,” while Eazi thinks it can be linked to ignorance. He added that not all music that comes out of Africa is afrobeats, “…There are a lot of different tribes — the language and culture are as different as the rhythms and BPMs of the music. You can have a hit song in Nigeria, but it won’t be a hit in Ghana.”

Buhari Mourns Ex-Supreme Court Justice Karibi-Whyte-Katamablog

A file photo of President Muhammadu Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari has offered his condolences to the people of Rivers State over the passing of a legal icon, Justice Adolphus Godwin Karibi-Whyte.

Karibi-Whyte, a retired Supreme Court justice who hailed from Rivers state, died on Friday in Port Harcourt aged 80.

In a statement released by Presidency spokesman, Femi Adesina, on Saturday, Buhari described Karibi-Whyte as an “erudite jurist” who “lived and led by example”.

Read the Presidency’s full statement below:

President Muhammadu Buhari sends condolences to government and people of Rivers State over the passing of legal icon, author and Professor of Law, Justice Adolphus Godwin Karibi-Whyte.

President Buhari prays that God will comfort all who mourn the legal colossus, especially his family, the academia, Nigerian Bar Association and Body of Benchers, friends and associates, commending his contributions to law and jurisprudence in the country, and beyond, leaving a legacy of integrity and nationalism.

President Buhari notes, with deep conviction, that the legal luminary used his knowledge, wisdom and experience in serving the nation he loved so much, working diligently as a scholar for many years, before transiting to the judiciary, and pursuing his passion of ensuring fairness through the Federal Revenue Court, Court of Appeal and Supreme Court of Nigeria.

The President affirms that Justice Karibi-Whyte played many historic roles in growing Nigeria’s legal system, strengthening democratic institutions and shaping the policy direction of many governments and international agencies, as he served as Chairman, Nigerian Constitutional Conference, 1994-1995, Counterfeit Currency Tribunal, Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Committee of Pro-Chancellors of State-Owned Universities, and Judge and Vice-President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia at The Hague.

The President believes the erudite jurist lived and led by example, set a standard for resourcefulness and patriotism, and brought honour to the country, praying that the almighty God will grant his soul a peaceful rest.

Femi Adesina
Special Adviser to the President
(Media & Publicity)
May 23, 2020

    ‘I Was In Hell’: Infected Pregnant Nurse Recounts COVID-19 Ordeal-Katamablog

    A health worker is reflected on a mirror while preparing to the COVID-19 zone of a hospital in Atizapan, Mexico, on May 22, 2020, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. PEDRO PARDO / AFP

    Liberian nurse Sedia Marwolo was 32 weeks pregnant when medics arrived at her home and hauled her away to a special coronavirus hospital, which she likened to “hell”. 

    It was the beginning of a 15-day ordeal during which the 38-year-old cried almost daily and was crippled with fear over whether her baby would survive her COVID-19 infection.

    Marwolo’s bosses sent her home in early May — without giving her a reason — although colleagues later told her that her immediate supervisor had tested positive for coronavirus.

    Five days after taking it upon herself to take a test, medical staff in protective gear were waiting for Marwolo at her house, while her neighbours watched her be taken away.

    In a nightmare for an expecting mother, Marwolo was separated from her family and taken to a coronavirus intensive care unit in a military hospital east of the capital Monrovia.

    “I was like in hell, alone, and abandoned,” she said. “To be pregnant and find yourself in a corona ICU is terrible”.

    Liberia has recorded some 250 cases to date, with 24 fatalities — a low number compared with virus-stricken Europe and the United States.

    But as with other poor countries in the region, there are fears that Liberia is ill equipped to handle a large outbreak.

    The nation of some 4.8 million people was already badly hit during West Africa’s 2014-16 Ebola crisis, which killed more than 4,800 people in Liberia.

    Inside the military hospital, Marwolo did not eat for two days out of fear. “I noticed that my baby was no longer moving in my stomach,” she said.

    But she found a friend and ally in Harriette Mondaye, a midwife employed by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), who counsels pregnant coronavirus patients.

    “It was a difficult moment,” Mondaye said, adding that the infected nurse cried every time they spoke on the phone.

    There are concerns that pregnant women are particularly vulnerable in the coronavirus crisis.

    During the Ebola crisis in Liberia, wary hospitals sometimes refused to take in any patients, leaving some pregnant women to give birth in the street.

    To avoid this scenario playing out again, the UNFPA is providing maternity advice in Liberia’s coronavirus hospital, Mondaye said.

    Marwolo eventually began to eat again, and was discharged from the coronavirus hospital after 15 days, having recovered.

    She then gave birth to baby girl, who did not contract the virus.

    But after surviving the ordeal, Marwolo and her family now face the stigma of having had a brush with COVID-19.

    Her husband and one of her three children also contracted the disease, and recovered, making the family near-pariahs in her neighbourhood.

    “The stigmatisation is another hell for any victim of this virus to go through,” she said.

    “It is like a curse. We are even planning to leave the community.”

    Marwolo credits her recovery to help from Mondaye, and wants to undertake further studies in order to counsel people in similar positions of distress.

    “She encouraged me, she gave me hope,” Marwolo said.

    Pochettino Wants To Manage Another Premier League Team-Katamablog

    Mauricio Pochettino says returning to the Premier League is his “priority”, stating he is eager to manage again six months after being sacked by Tottenham.

    The 48-year-old transformed Spurs’ fortunes during his five-and-a-half-year reign but failed to win a trophy and was sacked less than a year after leading them to the Champions League final.

    The Argentine has now ended his six-month “gardening leave”, meaning he is free to join another club.

    He has been heavily linked with Newcastle if their proposed Saudi Arabia-backed takeover goes through, while speculation over the Manchester United job has never gone away.

    “After six months, our tanks are completely full,” Pochettino told various British media outlets.

    “I have tried with my coaching staff to review everything that we did in the last seven years (including Southampton) because we never had a break until now.”

    Pochettino, who still lives in London, said he “loved” England and the Premier League.

    “I am not going change (my feelings) now because I am not involved in the Premier League,” he said. “Because I am no longer the Tottenham manager, I am not going to change my vision.

    “I still think the Premier League is the best league in the world. We enjoy it a lot. Of course, it’s one of the options. Of course, it can be my priority but I am not closed to move to a different country.”

    Pochettino said due to the uncertainty caused by the coronavirus crisis, it was difficult to know what opportunities would be available.

    “Today we are going to live a completely different era in football that we need to discover,” he said. “It’s difficult to know what project is going to be the right project.

    “There are many things, at the moment, that we have in our minds about how things are going to be after this virus hopefully disappears, but how are these clubs or companies, because that’s what they are, going to be? It’s a big question mark.”